Endnotes

1. Joshi, O.P. Gods of Heaven Home of Gods: A Study of Popular Prints. Jaipur, Illustrated Book Publishers, 1994. preface (unpaginated)

2. Introductory material based on Forward to Changing Myths and Images:Twentieth-Century Popular Art in India, catalogue by India Studies Program, Indiana University. Bloomington: Indiana university Art Museum, 1997. p6
3. Changing Myths and Images, 1997 p7. see also; Inglis, Stephan R. "Suitable for Framming: The Work of a Modern Master," in L.A. Bapp and S.S. Wadely, eds., Media and the Transforamtion of Religion in South Asia. Philedelphia: Universoty of Pennsylvania Press, 1995. pp51-58

4. Joshi, O.P. 1994 p378

5. Joshi, O.P., 1994 preface (unpaginated)

6. Image and identification information from Changing Myths and Images:Twentieth-Century Popular Art in India, catalogue by India Studies Program, Indiana University. Bloomington: Indiana university Art Museum, 1997. p15

7. Forward to Changing Myths and Images, 1997. p6

8. B.V. Dharap, Indian film critic, writes: "A major reason why movies quickly caught on with Indian audiences was the production of mythological films in the inital stage. The reverence fot the heavenly deities was deep and abiding. When these gods and goddesses appeared on the screen in flesh and blood from the cold pages of the scriptures and the epics and performed miracels, the illeterate spectators actually prostrated themselves, taking the screen-gods as real." (emphasis mine)
Many things are interesting about this quote, but my notation was to show that many varied froms of criticism of image worship occur. This one happens to fall out of the mouth of an educated Indian (who seems to forget that even educated Western Europeans and N. Americans were awe stuck and jumped from the seats at the oncomming train - when they were first shown films such as The Great Train Robbery. Audienceship had to be learned). Proof that orientalist scholarship is not always written by the outsiders, or Westerners... Dharap, B.V. in "The Mythological or Taking Fatalism for Granted," Indian Cinema: Superbazaar. New Delhi: Vikas Publishing House, PVT Limited, 1983. p79

9. Smith, David H. "Introduction and Impact of the God Posters on Hindus and their Devotional Traditions," Changing Myths and Images:Twentieth-Century Popular Art in India, catalogue by India Studies Program, Indiana University. Bloomington: Indiana university Art Museum, 1997. p17

10. Joshi, O.P. 1994 preface (unpaginated)

11. Smith, David H., 1997 p18

12. Smith, David H., 1997 p17

13. Smith, David H., 1997 p18

14. Smith, David H., 1997 p19

15. Larson, Geralds James "A Postmodernist Perspective on Indias Popular Religious Art" in Changing Myths and Images:Twentieth-Century Popular Art in India, catalogue by India Studies Program, Indiana University. Bloomington: Indiana university Art Museum, 1997. p25

16. Smith, David H., 1997 p20

17. Smith, David H., 1997 p18

Lithographic History
Mass Production
Cinema and Innovations
Questions
Endnotes
Bibliography